Search

Author

HA&D

LIFE AFTER PRATT – Meet Megan Welchel, HAD alumna!

 

Student Handbook 2017-2018

Contest! do you love selfies?

new doc 2017-09-12 10.23.21_2

Now, #HADPratt is on social media we have a gift.


Too many  posters have been posted in different places on the Brooklyn campus. All you have to do to be the happy winner is:

1.       Find 3 of the posters

2.       Take a creative picture with it and add the hashtag #hadselfie

3.       Follow us on Instagram

4.       Like us on Facebook

*This giveaway is only valid for Pratt students. (We’ll verify that the winner meets the conditions)

AND WIN AN AMAZON CARD!

Pretty easy right?
The contest will run from 09/12/17 to 10/06/17 at 11:59 pm ET.
Winner will be chosen at random on 10/10/17 from the list of entries received.

Happy second month to you all!

 

HAD Pratt

History of Art and Design department

Pratt Institute

“The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky”, A Review of Professor Mary D. Edwards for The MET

The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky

The very use of the word art suggests one of the basic differences between European or European-derived and American Indian concepts. For not only did few Indian groups allow art to become a major way of life, as in the West, but many Native American languages even lack a term meaning “art” or “artist.” If one wished to refer to a beautiful basket or a well-carved sculpture, it was usually necessary to rely upon such terms as “well-done,” “effective,” or perhaps “powerful” (in the magical sense).

Ranging from an ancient stone pipe and painted robes to drawings, paintings, collages, photographs, and a contemporary video installation, the exhibition “The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky,” reflects the significant place that Plains Indian culture holds in the heritage of North America and in European history. Works of art collected centuries ago by French traders and travelers are seen together with those acquired by Lewis and Clark on their famous expedition of 1804–06, along with objects from the early reservation period and recent works created in dialogue with traditional forms and ideas.

The adjunct professor Mary D. Edwards, of the History of Art and Design department at Pratt Institute, was published by the Metropolitan museum of art with the “The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky,” a review of the Exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art: March 3 – May 10, 2015, SECAC Art Inquiries, XVII, no. 1, 2016, pp. 68-71.

KIOWA_tipi cover_d645f8a5f41accdcc138ed6f35ba4985--native-american-indians-native-americans.jpg

This review describes Plains Indian masterworks found in European and North American collections, from pre-contact to contemporary, ranging from a two-thousand-year-old human-effigy stone pipe to contemporary paintings, photographs, and a video-installation piece.

It also presents the continuum of hundreds of years of artistic tradition, maintained against a backdrop of monumental cultural change. A complete explanation of the art pieces that provide a compelling of narrative about the ongoing vitality of Plains Indians art.

Check here for the review and to learn more!

The International Congress on Medieval Studies is an annual gathering of around 3,000 scholars interested in medieval studies. The congress features around 575 sessions of papers, panel discussions, roundtables, workshops and performances. Professor Mary D. Edwards gave a paper in Michigan “A New Medieval Source for Shakespeare’s Greatest Tragedy,” at the 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 13, 2017.

 

 

Oh my! Major Media Outlets Cover Pratt Professor’s Work to Restore Roman Painting Buried by Volcano

A number of prominent publications, including Forbes, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine, and Archeology Magazine, have recently spotlighted the cutting-edge work of Eleonora Del Federico, professor of chemistry at Pratt Institute, and a network of scientists and researchers to restore a Roman painting in the ancient town of Herculaneum. The work was discovered in the early 20th century after being buried by soot and ash from an eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D that led Herculaneum to suffer the same fate as Pompeii, which is located nearby.

 

Del Federico worked with a team that included Pratt School of Liberal Arts and Sciences faculty member Cindie Kehlet, professor in the department of Math and Science, and Pratt alumnae Haerin Kang, (B.A. Fine Arts ’17) and Megan Welchel (B.A. History of Art and Design ’07), who also serves as Math and Science Lab Technician at Pratt. The coverage has focused on how the team used a portable machine provided by XGLab, that allowed them to scan the painting, a portrait of a Roman woman, using a new type of high resolution X-ray technology.

3-roman-painting.adapt.536.1

In 2015, X-rays revealed a hidden figure in Rembrandt’s An Old Man in Military Costume. Scans of the abstract painter’s famous pieces revealed he sometimes used common house paints, rather than more pricey art oils, making him one of the first artists to do so.

The technique, which reveals how stunning the original painting was and gives information on materials and processes used to create it, could help conservators to more precisely restore the image as well as other ancient artworks.

“By unraveling the details of wall paintings that are no longer visible to the naked eye, we are in essence bringing these ancient people back to life,” Del Federico said in a press release. She believes that by learning about the quality and sophistication of a painting, characteristics such as the aspects of social life could be revealed.

Source : Sarah Gibbens , National Geographic

Read the articles in Forbes, Smithsonian Magazine, Archeology Magazine, and Sci-News.

Images: Courtesy of Roberto Alberti

 

Blog of the week! History of Sculpture – Professor Caterina Pierre’s class 9/12/17

IMG_5535

Here is the space for all the students to participate and send their class works to be published! @hadpratt

 

This week we want to share Emma Seely-Katz blog post

Blog for 9/6: Sculpture That Moves Me

Paul Thek has been one of my favorite artists ever since I discovered his work and story in the book Aliens & Anorexia by Chris Kraus. In it, Kraus details the lives of several artists and thinkers she feels are misunderstood or under-appreciated by society at large. Reading about a work of art before viewing it is a very interesting experience for me–I was immediately taken by Kraus’ description of Thek’s series of sculptures entitled Technological Reliquaries: “wax replicas of animal and human meat encased in glass” and even more so by this quote from Thek explaining that his relationship to visceral imagery was not intended to shock, but to detach and recontextualize: “It delighted me that bodies could be used to decorate a room, like flowers.”

A sculpture that stands out to me from the Reliquaries is called “Birthday Cake.” Four layers of what appears to be bloody “meat” with a layer of human-looking skin on top are stacked like a cake and topped with fuzzy hairs and cheerful pink candles. The “cake” is ensconced in a glass pyramid with metal hardware and yellow striations. The colors grabbed me first: Thek’s characteristic use of paint on wax produces lush, shiny, vital-looking reds and pinks with tinges of blues and greens, as if he’d cut slabs of meat just for the piece and they were in danger of going bad if left out for too long. What really enchants me about this piece is the attempt at demystifying the human body through what can be read as inherently violent imagery: though the image of animal meat doesn’t faze most humans, there is an unspoken distinction between human lives and “other” lives that renders comparisons of human bodies to lesser meat a taboo. Thek breaks this boundary by taking this violent imagery and subverting it with additions that could be considered “domestic,” “feminine,” and even “holy.”

The image of a tiered cake calls to mind frilly wedding receptions and the pink of the unlit candles recalls a birthday party color-coded towards femininity–the juxtaposition of femininity and violence shakes the dichotomy we are entrenched in that unequivocally assigns violence to the domain of “masculinity.” The pyramidal case (evoking ancient holy imagery that Thek returned to again and again in his pieces) with its industrial metal contrasts with its soft, organic, fleshy contents–is this “meat” under protection? Or is it being held captive? How far do we take our obsession with the human body and our certainty in its intrinsic value?

The de-gendering and reverent display of the “cake” raises questions about the value of anatomical form which are addressed by the overarching humor of the piece. Thek does not take himself too seriously and has a similar relationship towards bodies–Kraus cites an incident where Thek visited the Capuchin catacombs, which are decorated with decaying corpses. He picked up what he’d thought was a piece of paper–it was a human thigh. Thek said “We accept our thing-ness intellectually, but the emotional acceptance of it can be a joy.” My senior year of high school, I took a field trip with my anatomy class to a cadaver lab. I was nervous about how I’d react to seeing someone without consciousness, flayed open, empty of all vitality and agency. However, after getting to hold human organs and see a body in a purely aesthetic sense with none of the political and personal implications that are inherent in viewing a live body, I had at least a moment of acceptance of our thing-ness, and it was a joy.

Emma Seely-Katz

Professor Anca Lasc’s New Book is Available for Pre-order

anca lascs-03

Architecture of Display

Department Stores and Modern Retail

Through an international range of case studies from the 1870s to the present, this volume analyzes strategies of display in department stores and modern retail spaces. Established scholars and emerging researchers working within a range of disciplinary contexts and historiographical traditions shed light on what constitutes modern retail and the ways in which interior designers, architects, and artists have built or transformed their practice in response to the commercial context.

Architectures of Display is an important and welcome addition to the scholarship of interiors, retailing, and consumption. The fascinating case studies in the volume, not only engage with particular historic moments in retail design, but as a volume emphasize the crucial importance of the visual when engaging with consumers.” Clive Edwards, Emeritus Professor of Design History, Loughborough University, UK

“In its interrogation of the architecture of display, and display as integral to architecture’s cultural impact, this collection moves far beyond conventional studies of consumption. Its contributions are multiple and compelling: it situates the emergence of the display window and the department store within an expanded history of architecture’s material effects; it argues that techniques and technologies of display have been at the core of artistic experimentation; and it shows that the arrangement of consumer goods is nothing if not political.” Charles Rice, School of Architecture, University of Technology Sydney, Australia

Editors

Anca I. Lasc Assistant Professor of Design History in the History of Art and Design Department at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York.

Patricia Lara-Betancourt is a design historian and research fellow at The Modern Interiors Research Centre, Kingston University, London, UK.

Margaret Maile Petty is Professor and Head of the School of Design in the Creative Industries Faculty at Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.

Now its available for pre-order here

https://www.routledge.com/Architectures-of-Display-Department-Stores-and-Modern-Retail/Lasc-Lara-Betancourt-Maile-Petty/p/book/9781472468451

 

Interior Provocations/ Interiors Without Architecture

Call For Proposals

The second annual Pratt Interior Provocations symposium, Interiors without Architecture, seeks papers addressing the broad cultural, historical, and theoretical implications of interiors beyond their conventionally defined architectural boundaries, and not limited by interior design’s traditional associations with decoration, taste, and social status. This conference encourages provocative and boundary-expanding proposals from design practitioners, historians, and theorists addressing, for example, the implications of interior design expertise applied to prefabricated, reused enclosures not originally intended for human occupation; interiors composed by natural geography; interior environments created for literature, film, stage and virtual reality; interiors constructed within external urban surroundings; mobile interiors, inhabitable art; infrastructural interiors; interior landscapes; adaptive reuse and interiors; and interiors on and for display, including period rooms, model rooms, dioramas, and store display windows.

This symposium celebrates the publication of Interiors Beyond Architecture (Routledge 2018), co-edited by Deborah Schneiderman (Pratt Institute) and Amy Campos (California College of the Arts) as well as of Architectures of Display: Department Stores and Modern Retail (Routledge 2018), co-edited by Anca I. Lasc (Pratt Institute), Patricia Lara-Betancourt (The Modern Interiors Research Centre, Kingston University, London, UK), and Margaret Maile Petty (Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia).

Keynote Speaker:

Penny Sparke, Acting Dean and Professor of Design History; Director, Modern Interiors Research Centre, Kingston University, London, UK

Moderator:

Alice Friedman, Grace Slack McNeil Professor of American Art; Professor of Art, Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA, USA

Host Committee:

Pratt Institute, Department of Interior Design
-Deborah Schneiderman
-Keena Suh
-Karin Tehve
Pratt Institute, Department of the History of Art and Design
-Anca I. Lasc
-Karyn Zieve
Ryerson School of Interior Design
-Alexa Griffith Winton

 

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: