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LIFE AFTER PRATT – Meet Megan Welchel, HAD alumna!

 

Student Handbook 2017-2018

Contest! do you love selfies?

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Now, #HADPratt is on social media we have a gift.


Too many  posters have been posted in different places on the Brooklyn campus. All you have to do to be the happy winner is:

1.       Find 3 of the posters

2.       Take a creative picture with it and add the hashtag #hadselfie

3.       Follow us on Instagram

4.       Like us on Facebook

*This giveaway is only valid for Pratt students. (We’ll verify that the winner meets the conditions)

AND WIN AN AMAZON CARD!

Pretty easy right?
The contest will run from 09/12/17 to 10/06/17 at 11:59 pm ET.
Winner will be chosen at random on 10/10/17 from the list of entries received.

Happy second month to you all!

 

HAD Pratt

History of Art and Design department

Pratt Institute

Oh my! Major Media Outlets Cover Pratt Professor’s Work to Restore Roman Painting Buried by Volcano

A number of prominent publications, including Forbes, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine, and Archeology Magazine, have recently spotlighted the cutting-edge work of Eleonora Del Federico, professor of chemistry at Pratt Institute, and a network of scientists and researchers to restore a Roman painting in the ancient town of Herculaneum. The work was discovered in the early 20th century after being buried by soot and ash from an eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D that led Herculaneum to suffer the same fate as Pompeii, which is located nearby.

 

Del Federico worked with a team that included Pratt School of Liberal Arts and Sciences faculty member Cindie Kehlet, professor in the department of Math and Science, and Pratt alumnae Haerin Kang, (B.A. Fine Arts ’17) and Megan Welchel (B.A. History of Art and Design ’07), who also serves as Math and Science Lab Technician at Pratt. The coverage has focused on how the team used a portable machine provided by XGLab, that allowed them to scan the painting, a portrait of a Roman woman, using a new type of high resolution X-ray technology.

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In 2015, X-rays revealed a hidden figure in Rembrandt’s An Old Man in Military Costume. Scans of the abstract painter’s famous pieces revealed he sometimes used common house paints, rather than more pricey art oils, making him one of the first artists to do so.

The technique, which reveals how stunning the original painting was and gives information on materials and processes used to create it, could help conservators to more precisely restore the image as well as other ancient artworks.

“By unraveling the details of wall paintings that are no longer visible to the naked eye, we are in essence bringing these ancient people back to life,” Del Federico said in a press release. She believes that by learning about the quality and sophistication of a painting, characteristics such as the aspects of social life could be revealed.

Source : Sarah Gibbens , National Geographic

Read the articles in Forbes, Smithsonian Magazine, Archeology Magazine, and Sci-News.

Images: Courtesy of Roberto Alberti

 

Blog of the week! History of Sculpture – Professor Caterina Pierre’s class 9/12/17

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Here is the space for all the students to participate and send their class works to be published! @hadpratt

 

This week we want to share Emma Seely-Katz blog post

Blog for 9/6: Sculpture That Moves Me

Paul Thek has been one of my favorite artists ever since I discovered his work and story in the book Aliens & Anorexia by Chris Kraus. In it, Kraus details the lives of several artists and thinkers she feels are misunderstood or under-appreciated by society at large. Reading about a work of art before viewing it is a very interesting experience for me–I was immediately taken by Kraus’ description of Thek’s series of sculptures entitled Technological Reliquaries: “wax replicas of animal and human meat encased in glass” and even more so by this quote from Thek explaining that his relationship to visceral imagery was not intended to shock, but to detach and recontextualize: “It delighted me that bodies could be used to decorate a room, like flowers.”

A sculpture that stands out to me from the Reliquaries is called “Birthday Cake.” Four layers of what appears to be bloody “meat” with a layer of human-looking skin on top are stacked like a cake and topped with fuzzy hairs and cheerful pink candles. The “cake” is ensconced in a glass pyramid with metal hardware and yellow striations. The colors grabbed me first: Thek’s characteristic use of paint on wax produces lush, shiny, vital-looking reds and pinks with tinges of blues and greens, as if he’d cut slabs of meat just for the piece and they were in danger of going bad if left out for too long. What really enchants me about this piece is the attempt at demystifying the human body through what can be read as inherently violent imagery: though the image of animal meat doesn’t faze most humans, there is an unspoken distinction between human lives and “other” lives that renders comparisons of human bodies to lesser meat a taboo. Thek breaks this boundary by taking this violent imagery and subverting it with additions that could be considered “domestic,” “feminine,” and even “holy.”

The image of a tiered cake calls to mind frilly wedding receptions and the pink of the unlit candles recalls a birthday party color-coded towards femininity–the juxtaposition of femininity and violence shakes the dichotomy we are entrenched in that unequivocally assigns violence to the domain of “masculinity.” The pyramidal case (evoking ancient holy imagery that Thek returned to again and again in his pieces) with its industrial metal contrasts with its soft, organic, fleshy contents–is this “meat” under protection? Or is it being held captive? How far do we take our obsession with the human body and our certainty in its intrinsic value?

The de-gendering and reverent display of the “cake” raises questions about the value of anatomical form which are addressed by the overarching humor of the piece. Thek does not take himself too seriously and has a similar relationship towards bodies–Kraus cites an incident where Thek visited the Capuchin catacombs, which are decorated with decaying corpses. He picked up what he’d thought was a piece of paper–it was a human thigh. Thek said “We accept our thing-ness intellectually, but the emotional acceptance of it can be a joy.” My senior year of high school, I took a field trip with my anatomy class to a cadaver lab. I was nervous about how I’d react to seeing someone without consciousness, flayed open, empty of all vitality and agency. However, after getting to hold human organs and see a body in a purely aesthetic sense with none of the political and personal implications that are inherent in viewing a live body, I had at least a moment of acceptance of our thing-ness, and it was a joy.

Emma Seely-Katz

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